<html><head><meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html charset=utf-8"></head><body style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space;" class=""><div><blockquote type="cite" class=""><div dir="ltr" class=""><div class="gmail_extra"><div class="gmail_quote"><br class=""><div class=""> </div><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0px 0px 0px 0.8ex;border-left-width:1px;border-left-color:rgb(204,204,204);border-left-style:solid;padding-left:1ex"><div style="word-wrap:break-word" class=""><div class=""><br class=""></div><div class="">XQuery was baptized XQuery around 2001, when no JSON was around (yet)….</div><div class=""><br class=""></div></div></blockquote><div class=""><br class=""></div><div class="">No  Java was ……</div></div></div></div></blockquote><div><br class=""></div>Java had at that time it’s own query language, actually made by some people originally involved with XQuery.</div><div><a href="https://docs.oracle.com/javaee/6/tutorial/doc/bnbtg.html" class="">https://docs.oracle.com/javaee/6/tutorial/doc/bnbtg.html</a></div><div><br class=""><blockquote type="cite" class=""><div class=""><div dir="ltr" class=""><div class="gmail_extra"><div class="gmail_quote"><div class=""><br class=""></div><div class=""> </div><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0px 0px 0px 0.8ex;border-left-width:1px;border-left-color:rgb(204,204,204);border-left-style:solid;padding-left:1ex"><div style="word-wrap:break-word" class=""><div class=""></div><div class="">True that JSON was created later in the same year 2001, however  it did not become widely popular </div><div class="">about until much later. </div><div class=""><br class=""></div></div></blockquote><div class=""><br class=""></div><div class="">....but Java was already very very popular.</div><div class=""><br class=""></div><div class="">Now supposing an individual had cobbled together a language in 10 days that was so crap that it's leading protagonist actually had to write a book highlighting it's good parts. Read the first paragraph here.</div><div class=""><br class=""></div><div class=""><a href="https://www.w3.org/community/webed/wiki/A_Short_History_of_JavaScript" class="">https://www.w3.org/community/webed/wiki/A_Short_History_of_JavaScript</a> </div><div class=""><br class=""></div><div class="">Imagine if they left the name as LiveScript or ECMAScript and note in the last sentence of paragraph 1 why they didn’t.</div></div></div></div></div></blockquote><br class=""></div><div>That’s funny and interesting from a historical point of view.</div><div><br class=""></div><div>But that’s water under the bridge.</div><div><br class=""></div><div>============</div><div><br class=""></div><div>The question for me is what could XQuery — and all the hard years of heavy experience that we all acquired in querying and processing, indexing, etc for schema-less data  during 18 years — bring to the world of NoSQL query languages, which, today, is pretty pathetic. </div><div><br class=""></div><div><br class=""></div><div>Best regards</div><div>Dana</div><div><br class=""></div><div><br class=""></div><div><br class=""></div><div><br class=""></div><div><br class=""></div><div><br class=""></div><div><br class=""></div><div><br class=""></div><div><br class=""></div></body></html>